Categories
Uncategorized

The Empty Glass: A Novel


Price: $7.99
(as of Aug 03,2021 01:28:32 UTC – Details)

Central Intelligence Agency

In the early-morning hours of August 5, 1962, Los Angeles County deputy coroner Ben Fitzgerald arrives at the home of the world's most famous movie star, now lying dead in her bedroom, naked and still clutching a telephone.  There he discovers The Book of Secrets – Marilyn Monroe's diary – revealing a doomed love affair with a man she refers to only as "The General."  In the following days, Ben unravels a wide-ranging cover-up and some heartbreaking truths about the fragile, luminous woman behind the celebrity.  Soon the sinister and surreal accounts in The Book of Secrets bleed into Ben's own life, and he finds himself, like Monroe, trapped in a deepening paranoid conspiracy.  The Empty Glass is an unforgettable combination of the riveting facts and legendary theories that have dogged Monroe, the Kennedy's, the Mafia, and even the CIA for decades.  It is an exciting debut from a remarkable new thriller writer.

Categories
Uncategorized

Roaming Around-From Hollywood to Outer Mongolia: My Life as a Reporter for the Hollywood Citizen-News


Price: $36.99
(as of Aug 03,2021 01:28:32 UTC – Details)

Austin Conover

“Roaming Around” was Austin Conover’s column in the Hollywood Citizen-News and roam he did. He covered the movie capital during the “nightmare years” when Communist infiltration was suspect in the film industry. As foreign correspondent he was present during the first CIA incited revolt in Guatemala. He roamed to Israel in search of the Dead Sea Scrolls, to Outer Mongolia during the clash that broke the Communist monolith, to South Viet Nam for updates on the war and to the USSR for glimpses of life behind the Iron Curtain. In the course of 32 years, he interviewed five U.S Presidents, the general who led the first air raid on Tokyo, a chancellor of West Germany who defied Hitler and the first Prime Minister of India. Also included are noteworthy stories about actors, educators, novelists and scientists, as well as blacklisted Communist Party members and one idealist who served with the Abraham Lincoln Brigade in the Spanish Civil War. His “Campground Russia” series, in which he reported a trek across Russia with his family, was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize. At the heart of this book is a love story: for almost 65 years, he shared these adventures with his beloved Cathy.

Categories
Uncategorized

The CIA in Hollywood: How the Agency Shapes Film and Television


Price: points - Details)

CIA influence on public opinion

What’s your impression of the CIA? A bumbling agency that can’t protect its own spies? A rogue organization prone to covert operations and assassinations? Or a dedicated public service that advances the interests of the United States? Astute TV and movie viewers may have noticed that the CIA’s image in popular media has spanned this entire range, with a decided shift to more positive portrayals in recent years. But what very few people know is that the Central Intelligence Agency has been actively engaged in shaping the content of film and television, especially since it established an entertainment industry liaison program in the mid-1990s.

The CIA in Hollywood offers the first full-scale investigation of the relationship between the Agency and the film and television industries. Tricia Jenkins draws on numerous interviews with the CIA’s public affairs staff, operations officers, and historians, as well as with Hollywood technical consultants, producers, and screenwriters who have worked with the Agency, to uncover the nature of the CIA’s role in Hollywood. In particular, she delves into the Agency’s and its officers’ involvement in the production of The Agency, In the Company of Spies, Alias, The Recruit, The Sum of All Fears, Enemy of the State, Syriana, The Good Shepherd, and more. Her research reveals the significant influence that the CIA now wields in Hollywood and raises important and troubling questions about the ethics and legality of a government agency using popular media to manipulate its public image.

Categories
Uncategorized

The CIA in Hollywood: How the Agency Shapes Film and Television


Price: points - Details)

Cold War in popular culture

“Jenkins’s book raises serious ethical and legal questions about the relationship between the CIA and Hollywood and the extent to which we consume propaganda from one through the other. . . . Should the CIA be authorized to target American public opinion? If our artists don’t confront [the question] more directly, and soon, the Agency will only continue to infiltrate our vulnerable film and television screens―and our minds.”―Tom Hayden, Los Angeles Review of Books“The book makes a strong case that the CIA should not be in Hollywood at all, but that if it is, it cannot pick and choose which movies it wishes to support. Well written and researched, this study examines a subject that has not received enough scholarly or critical attention. Highly recommended.”―Choice“A fascinating, highly readable, and original new work. . . . Incorporating effective, illustrative case studies, The CIA in Hollywood is definitely recommended to students of film, media relations, the CIA, and U.S. interagency relations.”―H-Net Reviews

Categories
Uncategorized

Argo: How the CIA and Hollywood Pulled Off the Most Audacious Rescue in History


Price: $12.99
(as of Aug 03,2021 01:28:33 UTC – Details)

Antonio Mendez

The true account of the 1979 rescue of six American hostages from Iran

On November 4, 1979, Iranian militants stormed the American embassy in Tehran and captured dozens of American hostages, sparking a 444-day ordeal and a quake in global politics still reverberating today. But there’s a little-known footnote to the crisis: six Americans escaped. And a midlevel agent named Antonio Mendez devised an ingenious yet incredibly risky plan to rescue them.

Armed with foreign film visas, Mendez and an unlikely team of CIA agents and Hollywood insiders – directors, producers, actors – traveled to Tehran under the guise of scouting locations for a fake film called Argo. While pretending to find the perfect scenery and backdrops, the team succeeded in contacting the escapees and smuggling them out of Iran without a single shot being fired.

Antonio Mendez finally details the mind-bogglingly complex and dangerous operation he led more than three decades ago. A true story of secret identities and international intrigue, Argo is the gripping account of the history-making collusion between Hollywood and high-stakes espionage.


Get more included with membership:Get more included with membership:

1 credit a month

1 credit a month

The Plus Catalog

The Plus Catalog

Podcasts

Podcasts

Categories
Uncategorized

Top Defense Officials Hold News Conference on Artificial Intelligence DC, UNITED STATES 09.10.2020



Top Defense Officials Hold News Conference on Artificial Intelligence DC, UNITED STATES 09.10.2020 Courtesy Video Defense.gov Top officials with the …

source

Categories
Uncategorized

Russian Opposition Leader Navalny Accuses Putin Of Being Behind Poisoning



BERLIN

BERLIN (AP) — Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny, who is recovering in Germany after being poisoned in Russia by a nerve agent, accused Russian President Vladimir Putin of being behind the attack in comments released Thursday.

Navalny’s supporters have frequently maintained that such an attack could have only been ordered at the top levels, although the Kremlin has repeatedly dismissed the accusations.

Navalny, politician and corruption investigator who is Putin’s fiercest critic, was flown to Germany two days after falling ill on Aug. 20 on a domestic flight in Russia. He spent 32 days in the hospital, 24 of them in intensive care, before doctors deemed his condition had improved sufficiently for him to be discharged.

He has posted frequent comments online as his recovery has progressed, but in his first interview since the attack, he told Germany’s Der Spiegel magazine that in his mind, “Putin was behind the attack,” in a German translation of his comments.

“I don’t have any other versions of how the crime was committed,” he said in a brief excerpt of the interview conducted in Berlin on Wednesday and to be released in full online later Thursday.

The Kremlin on Thursday said that “such accusations against the Russian president are absolutely groundless and unacceptable.”

“Some of these statements in the mentioned publication we consider offensive,” Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters.

Peskov charged that “specialists” from the CIA were working with Navalny “these days” and giving him instructions.

“There is information that these instructors are working with him these days,” Peskov said. “Instructions the patient is receiving are obvious. We have seen such lines of behavior more than once.”

Earlier Thursday, Vyacheslav Volodin, speaker of the State Duma, Russia’s lower parliament house, called Navalny “shameless” and “dishonorable” and accused the politician of working with “security services of Western countries.”

“Putin saved his life,” Volodin said in a statement released by the Duma. “Everyone, from pilots and doctors to the president, were genuinely saving him. Only a dishonorable person can make statements like this.”

Navalny spent two days in a coma in a hospital in the Siberian city of Omsk, where Russian doctors said they found no trace of any poisoning, before being transported to Berlin for treatment. German chemical weapons experts determined that he was poisoned with the Soviet-era nerve agent Novichok — findings corroborated by labs in France and Sweden.

The nerve agent used in the attack was the same class of poison that Britain said was used on former Russian spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter in Salisbury, England, in 2018.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel called the poisoning an attempted murder and she and other world leaders have demanded that Russia fully investigate the case.

Russia has bristled at the demands for an investigation, saying that Germany needs to share medical data in the case or compare notes with Russian doctors. Germany has noted that Russian doctors have their own samples from Navalny since he was in their care for 48 hours.

The Hague-based Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons has collected independent samples from Navalny for testing, but results haven’t yet been announced.

German doctors have said the 44-year-old Navalny could make a full recovery, though haven’t ruled out the possibility of long-term damage from the nerve agent.

Spiegel said Navalny was joking and alert in the interview, although his hands shook so much it was difficult for him to drink from a bottle of water. He also reiterated what his team has previously said — that he planned on returning to Russia when he was able to do so.

“My job now is to remain the guy who isn’t scared,” he was quoted as saying. “And I’m not scared.”





Source link